Majority of Canadian cities don’t monitor real-time data of sewage leaks into lakes, rivers

Majority of Canadian cities don’t monitor real-time data of sewage leaks into lakes, rivers

There, in plain sight and floating around the docks and pedestrian bridges along the waterfront of Canada’s biggest city, was a toxic stew of used condoms, plastic tampon applicators and mounds of shredded toilet paper, along with a countless quantity of other, unidentifiable solids.

Government of Canada supports international water conference in Saskatoon

Government of Canada supports international water conference in Saskatoon

Experts from around the world are in Saskatoon to discuss managing water for sustainable agriculture in the face of climate change. The 2018 annual conference of the International Commission on Irrigation and Drainage is being supported by the Government of Canada through a $15,000 investment from Western Economic Diversification Canada's Western Diversification Program.

Iqaluit residents speak out on trucked water, sewage services

Iqaluit residents speak out on trucked water, sewage services

The public gallery at Iqaluit city hall was packed for Thursday night's public consultation on a bylaw that governs the city's water supply and sewer service. However, with increasing water restrictions due to low levels in the city's water supply from Lake Geraldine, people came out en masse to talk about water usage in general.

Condoms, pads, tampon applicators found at the Harbourfront following Tuesday's storm

Condoms, pads, tampon applicators found at the Harbourfront following Tuesday's storm

If you were thinking about taking a dip in the lake at Toronto's Harbourfront area, you may want to make other plans. Tuesday's heavy rainfall, which totalled about 70 mm within a 24-hour span, caused a large sewage spill into the city's Inner Harbour. As a result, an excessive amount of condoms, pads and tampons was found floating amid the garbage.

No-swimming advisories not stopping people from taking a dip at Parlee Beach

No-swimming advisories not stopping people from taking a dip at Parlee Beach

A no-swimming advisory during the entire New Brunswick Day weekend didn't stop beachgoers from taking a dip at Parlee Beach. Water samples turned up with high levels of fecal bacteria three days in a row — from water tested Thursday, Friday and Saturday. But the beach was busy, with lifeguards watching over it and many children swimming in the water.

As forest fires burn in Ontario, experts warn of long-term environmental impact

As forest fires burn in Ontario, experts warn of long-term environmental impact

Forest fires could also have an effect on drinking water if materials that pose a health concern make their way into a groundwater supply, according to a team of researchers in Alberta that is studying the issue. While not all forest fires have a large impact on drinking water, the matter is one that calls for further examination, said Monica Emelko, who is part of the research team for the Southern Rockies Watershed Project.

What if Ottawa spends $2B on water for First Nations and it still isn’t safe for everyone to drink?

What if Ottawa spends $2B on water for First Nations and it still isn’t safe for everyone to drink?

A green dot. That’s the symbol the federal government uses for this First Nation in the Gatineau River Valley. An online map that tracks one of the Liberal administration’s signature pledges — to rid First Nations of warnings that their tap water is dirty and unsafe — marks Kitigan Zibi with a green dot, like a traffic signal, indicating Mission Accomplished.

Securing Water for the City

Securing Water for the City

It's a big project that has been on the books for a number of years, but the cost and logistics of the project kept it from being moved into the budget. But with a growing concern of securing clean, safe drinking water around the world, the City of Moose Jaw is close to completing a new water transmission line that should provide that resource to the community for many years to come.

Canada remains opposed to Aboriginal rights and valuing Indigenous lives

Canada remains opposed to Aboriginal rights and valuing Indigenous lives

Grassy Narrows First Nation has been beset with indifference for their lives and their rights by the Canadian government for five decades. From 1962 to 1970, the Dryden paper mill dumped 10 tonnes of mercury into the Wabigoon River upstream from Grassy Narrows. This polluted fish and drinking wells. The federal and provincial governments claimed as late as 2016 that the river would clean out the mercury naturally. Despite reports as early as 1984 stating government action was needed. Still nothing has been done. The Canadian government’s utter disregard for Indigenous lives is so perverse that until recently it has not allotted resources for researchers to intensively study the health impact of the mercury. Rather, the bulk of research done has been by a Japanese research team that in 2012 found at least one resident who was born with mercury poisoning and, in 2007, two children born with brain cancer and who experienced seizures.