bacteria

Nova Scotians urged to test well water after Health Canada sets new guideline for manganese

Nova Scotians urged to test well water after Health Canada sets new guideline for manganese

Nova Scotians with private wells are encouraged to test their drinking water regularly and treat it when needed to protect themselves from consuming too much manganese. Manganese is a mineral that is beneficial in the growth of healthy bone and tissue, but too much of it can cause damage.

Majority of Canadian cities don’t monitor real-time data of sewage leaks into lakes, rivers

Majority of Canadian cities don’t monitor real-time data of sewage leaks into lakes, rivers

There, in plain sight and floating around the docks and pedestrian bridges along the waterfront of Canada’s biggest city, was a toxic stew of used condoms, plastic tampon applicators and mounds of shredded toilet paper, along with a countless quantity of other, unidentifiable solids.

Untreated sewage pollutes water across the country

Untreated sewage pollutes water across the country

Nearly 120 million cubic metres of untreated sewage and runoff entered Canadian waterways in 2016, StarMetro has learned.
That’s roughly the same amount of water that roars over the edge of Niagara Falls over the course of 12 hours — except it’s not whitewater spewing from these pipes. It’s murky, brown and a little bit chunky.

Water treatment plant opens its doors

Water treatment plant opens its doors

On November 19, 2015, James Smith Cree Nation welcomed about 50 people for an open house at their integrated biological reverse osmosis membrane water treatment plant. The attendees were a mixture of First Nations, James Smith Indian Reserve residents, including James Smith Cree Nation (JSCN) Chief, Justin Burns, visitors from Stanley Mission, industry representatives, two representatives from the Water Security Agency, and main presenter, Dr. Hans Peterson.